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ANSWERED!! How would George interpret his suffering in

The practice of health care providers at all levels brings you into contact with people from a variety of faiths. This calls for knowledge and understanding of a diversity of faith expressions; for the purpose of this course, the focus will be on the Christian worldview.

Based on “Case Study: End of Life Decisions,” the Christian worldview, and the worldview questions presented in the required topic study materials you will complete an ethical analysis of George’s situation and his decision from the perspective of the Christian worldview.

Provide a 1,500-2,000-word ethical analysis while answering the following questions:

  1. How would George interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative, with an emphasis on the fallenness of the world?
  2. How would George interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative, with an emphasis on the hope of resurrection?
  3. As George contemplates life with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), how would the Christian worldview inform his view about the value of his life as a person?
  4. What sorts of values and considerations would the Christian worldview focus on in deliberating about whether or not George should opt for euthanasia?
  5. Given the above, what options would be morally justified in the Christian worldview for George and why?
  6. Based on your worldview, what decision would you make if you were in George’s situation?

Remember to support your responses with the topic study materials.

Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is required.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

Case Study: End of Life Decisions

George is a successful attorney in his mid-fifties. He is also a legal scholar, holding a teaching post at the local university law school in Oregon. George is also actively involved in his teenage son’s basketball league, coaching regularly for their team. Recently, George has experienced muscle weakness and unresponsive muscle coordination. He was forced to seek medical attention after he fell and injured his hip. After an examination at the local hospital following his fall, the attending physician suspected that George may be showing early symptoms for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease affecting the nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The week following the initial examination, further testing revealed a positive diagnosis of ALS.

ALS is progressive and gradually causes motor neuron deterioration and muscle atrophy to the point of complete muscle control loss. There is currently no cure for ALS, and the median life expectancy is between 3 and 4 years, though it is not uncommon for some to live 10 or more years. The progressive muscle atrophy and deterioration of motor neurons leads to the loss of the ability to speak, move, eat, and breathe. However, sight, touch, hearing, taste, and smell are not affected. Patients will be wheelchair bound and eventually need permanent ventilator support to assist with breathing.

George and his family are devastated by the diagnosis. George knows that treatment options only attempt to slow down the degeneration, but the symptoms will eventually come. He will eventually be wheelchair bound and be unable to move, eat, speak, or even breathe on his own.

In contemplating his future life with ALS, George begins to dread the prospect of losing his mobility and even speech. He imagines his life in complete dependence upon others for basic everyday functions and perceives the possibility of eventually degenerating to the point at which he is a prisoner in his own body. Would he be willing to undergo such torture, such loss of his own dignity and power? George thus begins inquiring about the possibility of voluntary euthanasia.

Course Code Class Code Assignment Title Total Points
PHI-413V PHI-413V-O503 Case Study on Death and Dying 200.0
Criteria Percentage Unsatisfactory (0.00%) Less Than Satisfactory (65.00%) Satisfactory (75.00%) Good (85.00%) Excellent (100.00%) Comments Points Earned
Content 70.0%
Suffering and Fallenness of the World 12.0% Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the fallenness of the world is insufficient or not supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the fallenness of the world is unclear or vaguely supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the fallenness of the world is clear and supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the fallenness of the world is clear and skillfully supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the fallenness of the world is clear and demonstrates a deep understanding that is skillfully supported by topic study materials.
Suffering and the Hope of Resurrection 12.0% Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the hope of resurrection is insufficient or not supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the hope of resurrection is unclear or vaguely supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the hope of resurrection is clear and supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the hope of resurrection is clear and skillfully supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the man would interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative and the hope of resurrection is clear and demonstrates a deep understanding that is skillfully supported by topic study materials.
Value of Life 12.0% Analysis of how the Christian worldview of the man might inform his view about the value of his life as a person with ALS is insufficient or not supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the Christian worldview of the man might inform his view about the value of his life as a person with ALS is unclear or vaguely supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the Christian worldview of the man might inform his view about the value of his life as a person with ALS is clear and supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the Christian worldview of the man might inform his view about the value of his life as a person with ALS is clear and skillfully supported by topic study materials. Analysis of how the Christian worldview of the man might inform his view about the value of his life as a person with ALS is clear and demonstrates a deep understanding that is skillfully supported by topic study materials.
Euthanasia 12.0% Evaluation of which values and considerations the Christian worldview focuses on when deliberating the option of euthanasia for the man is insufficient or not supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which values and considerations the Christian worldview focuses on when deliberating the option of euthanasia for the man is unclear or vaguely supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which values and considerations the Christian worldview focuses on when deliberating the option of euthanasia for the man is clear and supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which values and considerations the Christian worldview focuses on when deliberating the option of euthanasia for the man is clear and skillfully supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which values and considerations the Christian worldview focuses on when deliberating the option of euthanasia for the man is clear and demonstrates a deep understanding that is skillfully supported by topic study materials.
Morally Justified Options 12.0% Evaluation of which options would be justified in the Christian worldview for the man is insufficient or not supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which options would be justified in the Christian worldview for the man is unclear or vaguely supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which options would be justified in the Christian worldview for the man is clear and supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which options would be justified in the Christian worldview for the man is clear and skillfully supported by topic study materials. Evaluation of which options would be justified in the Christian worldview for the man is clear and demonstrates a deep understanding that is skillfully supported by topic study materials.
Personal Decision 10.0% Reflection hypothesis of which personal choices would be made if faced with ALS based on personal worldview is insufficient. Reflection hypothesis of which choices would be made if faced with ALS based on personal worldview is lacking a personal connection. Reflection hypothesis of which personal choices would be made if faced with ALS based on personal worldview is clear. Reflection hypothesis of which personal choices would be made if faced with ALS based on personal worldview is clear and thoughtful. Reflection hypothesis of which personal choices would be make if faced with ALS based on personal worldview is clear, relevant, and insightful.
Organization, Effectiveness, and Format 30.0%
Thesis Development and Purpose 7.0% Paper lacks any discernible overall purpose or organizing claim. Thesis is insufficiently developed or vague. Purpose is not clear. Thesis is apparent and appropriate to purpose. Thesis is clear and forecasts the development of the paper. Thesis is descriptive and reflective of the arguments and appropriate to the purpose. Thesis is comprehensive and contains the essence of the paper. Thesis statement makes the purpose of the paper clear.
Argument Logic and Construction 8.0% Statement of purpose is not justified by the conclusion. The conclusion does not support the claim made. Argument is incoherent and uses noncredible sources. Sufficient justification of claims is lacking. Argument lacks consistent unity. There are obvious flaws in the logic. Some sources have questionable credibility. Argument is orderly, but may have a few inconsistencies. The argument presents minimal justification of claims. Argument logically, but not thoroughly, supports the purpose. Sources used are credible. Introduction and conclusion bracket the thesis. Argument shows logical progression. Techniques of argumentation are evident. There is a smooth progression of claims from introduction to conclusion. Most sources are authoritative. Clear and convincing argument presents a persuasive claim in a distinctive and compelling manner. All sources are authoritative.
Mechanics of Writing  (includes spelling, punctuation, grammar, language use) 5.0% Surface errors are pervasive enough that they impede communication of meaning. Inappropriate word choice or sentence construction is used. Frequent and repetitive mechanical errors distract the reader. Inconsistencies in language choice (register) or word choice are present. Sentence structure is correct but not varied. Some mechanical errors or typos are present, but they are not overly distracting to the reader. Correct and varied sentence structure and audience-appropriate language are employed. Prose is largely free of mechanical errors, although a few may be present. The writer uses a variety of effective sentence structures and figures of speech. Writer is clearly in command of standard, written, academic English.
Paper Format  (use of appropriate style for the major and assignment) 5.0% Template is not used appropriately, or documentation format is rarely followed correctly. Appropriate template is used, but some elements are missing or mistaken. A lack of control with formatting is apparent. Appropriate template is used. Formatting is correct, although some minor errors may be present. Appropriate template is fully used. There are virtually no errors in formatting style. All format elements are correct.
Documentation of Sources (citations, footnotes, references, bibliography, etc., as appropriate to assignment and style) 5.0% Sources are not documented. Documentation of sources is inconsistent and/or incorrect, as appropriate to assignment and style, with numerous formatting errors. Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, although some formatting errors may be present. Sources are documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is mostly correct. Sources are completely and correctly documented, as appropriate to assignment and style, and format is free of error.

ANSWER

Case Study on Death and Dying

The concept of death and dying, is, in most cases viewed from different perspectives depending on one’s cultural and spiritual beliefs.   An individual’s choice on how they approach or look at death can also vary depending on the condition they are in. The selection of voluntary euthanasia, in light of terminal illnesses, is one which has elicited discussion, especially from different religious groups, including Christianity. This paper will evaluate a case of Mr George, a fifty-year-old lawyer diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Due to his condition, George is considering voluntary euthanasia as a possible option to avoid the harrowing life that awaits him after the disease has taken its course.

How would George interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative, with an emphasis on the fallenness of the world?

The Christian narrative has different interpretations of suffering as that which is experienced by George. The first interpretation of suffering is the notion that suffering comes as a form of test to measure our faith in God (O’brien, 2017). There are various biblical examples where suffering was used as a test of faith. Such instances describe the fact that after one has demonstrated their true faith in God, they can then overcome the suffering and come out victorious, with their state prior to the suffering being restored (O’brien, 2017). This narrative calls for one to persevere throughout the entire ordeal, which in the given case, George may not be thinking as such. The second narrative is where suffering is used as a punishment occurring after one has sinned. The biblical narrative established the fact that sinners will be punished for the sins they have committed. In such a case, then George may view his suffering as retribution for the sins he has committed in his lifetime.

Taking into consideration George’s perspective and linking it to the Christian narrative, George may believe that escaping this world, which is laced with sin may, in turn, be a better option for him. The Christian narrative, after all, assures life after death and one which is free of suffering for those who are righteous (Doka & Morgan, 2016). He might be looking at the world as a place which is full of suffering as a result of the sins committed by man to God. God being the creator of the world, therefore, punishes its inhabitants with different forms of suffering, including untreatable conditions like the one faced by George, as retribution of sinning against Him.

How would George interpret his suffering in light of the Christian narrative, with an emphasis on the hope of resurrection?

Using the narratives described in the previous section, facing such a condition as the one being faced by George, there are various perspectives which may be taken by George. Knowing the world as a fallen place for sinners, with heaven being a place for the righteous, George may view death as a gateway which will allow him to escape the suffering that awaits him with the progression of his medical condition. By leaving this world, then George may be hoping to resurrect in a world free from suffering. Alternatively, George may also view escaping his suffering by engaging involuntary euthanasia to be equivalent to committing suicide and in extension, a sin against God (Rumun, 2014). Being his last act, this will prevent him from having any hope of resurrection and in return, guarantee him eternal suffering in the afterlife as per the biblical narrative.

The biblical narrative gives various examples where suffering was used as a conduit to establish a closer relationship with God. Earthly suffering from a biblical perspective is considered an essential part of the process towards eternal life through resurrection. Those who overcame the suffering from the biblical narrative were assured eternal life free of the suffering as experienced here on earth. With this perspective, then George should not consider voluntary euthanasia as his option of dealing with the expected suffering.

As George contemplates life with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), how would the Christian worldview inform his view about the value of his life as a person?

Given the condition being faced by George, there is a high likelihood that he has already lost hope in living depending on his perspective of what a human person is. Many at times, people with terminal illnesses like ALS consider themselves as lesser human beings or people waiting on the death list. As such, their perception of life my change whereby, they are likely to consider their lives as being unworthy. That is why, in most cases, such patients consider euthanasia as the most viable option (Sharp, 2017).

From a Christian worldview, life is considered sacred and belongs to God, who is the creator. Therefore, taking one’s own life is regarded as a sin regardless of the condition one is in. Using this narrative, then all lives before the eyes of God can be considered as being equal in value (O’brien, 2017). The same way God views a healthy person is the same way He views a diseased person. As such, the Christian world view considers George to still retain his value as a person, regardless of his condition. In light of this, the Christian worldview, therefore, prohibits using earthly suffering as a reason to take one’s own life. According to the biblical narrative which dictates the Christian worldview, every person is purposed to accomplish a certain mission in accordance with God’s design. Upon the accomplishment of that mission, in God’s own timing, one transitions to the afterlife through death. Taking one’s own life is equivalent to departing the world before accomplishing God’s intended purpose on earth. All the scenarios highlighted indicate the value of life from a Christian worldview which may help George in choosing his preferred course of action in dealing with the illness.

What sorts of values and considerations would the Christian worldview focus on in deliberating about whether or not George should opt for euthanasia?

            The Christian worldview in light of George’s condition will employ different values and consideration as dictated by the biblical teachings. One of the considerations which will be taken is the value of life as earlier discussed. The Christian worldview considers the sanctity of life and considers it as a gift from God.  Before God’s will for an individual is accomplished, then taking that life away is considered a sin before God. Likewise, Christians view the concept of birth and death as holding high spiritual significance, in the sense that both processes are controlled by the creator and therefore should not be interrupted by man (SSorajjakool et al., 2017). The fact that Christians also believe that all human beings were created in the likeness of God, then defiling the image of God through suicide, may be considered a sin. Therefore, opting for euthanasia, according to the Christian worldview, may be going contrary to God’s will.

Another Christian virtue is the virtue of perseverance. The biblical narrative elaborates preserving through hardship and suffering as being an essential aspect of a Christians life. It is through perseverance and maintaining a firm stance of faith that we get closer to God. the biblical narrative establishes that resurrection comes to those who persevere to the end (Romans 5:1-5, New International Version Bible).

Given the above, what options would be morally justified in the Christian worldview for George and why?

            From a Christian worldview, George should opt to persevere through the suffering with the belief that through his suffering, he will receive renewed strength from God. Given the Christian perspective on the value of life and perception of sin, George opting for euthanasia will be considered going against God’s will. The Christian worldview also looks at death as a phenomenon which should not be interfered with by mortals, and left only to God, for he is the creator and therefore the owner of that life (De Villiers, 2016). Taking away that life through euthanasia will be tantamount to robbing God His possession. Ultimately, the Christian perspective considers all life as having equal value and George should not consider his as being any less valuable in light of his medical condition. These are some of the moral considerations which George ought to take by employed a Christian point of view.

Based on your worldview, what decision would you make if you were in George’s situation?

            It is indeed a difficult choice to make when faced with such an illness as one experienced by George. When one encounters a seemingly hopeless situation, there are several considerations which come into play to make a decision. One of those considerations is, of course, the quality of life one will lead in light of the situation. Being incapacitated for the rest of your life seems to be harrowing enough ordeal which one would never want to experience. Other than that, how the medical condition will impact the immediate family members is also a factor. In most cases, one would consider the burden left to those who care for them as being unbearable as such opting to rid them of that burden by going for options such as euthanasia (Movahedi & Tavacoly, 2016). In some instances, one may not have someone to care for them, which exposes them to even more suffering. Taking all the listed considerations into perspective, opting for euthanasia will most likely be the selected choice of action to take.

However, coming from a strong spiritual background, where practices like euthanasia are considered sinful, then consideration of other options will be my preferred course of action. My spiritual perspective is one which is cemented on hope and faith that things may turn out for the best. Therefore, I would opt for the treatment regimens, which are aimed at reducing the progression of the disease. I will consider this option in the hope that, after the bought time, a more permanent treatment solution will be available in the market, allowing the condition to get treated.

Conclusion

The concept of death and dying is one which breeds difficult moral dilemmas, especially when faced with a seemingly hopeless situation. The use of euthanasia as a possible option when dealing with terminal illnesses is one which, according to the Christian worldview, is considered as a sin. However, a patient facing such a condition may be inclined to opt for such measures, given the envisioned suffering faced by themselves, and their loved ones as a result of the disease. This paper has therefore described the various considerations on the subject according to a Christian worldview. The paper has described dealing with the issue from a Christian perspective and concluded by explaining my personal perspective on the subject.

References

De Villiers, D. E. (2016). May Christians request medically assisted suicide and euthanasia?. HTS Theological Studies72(4), 1-9.

Doka, K. J., & Morgan, J. D. (2016). Death and spirituality. Routledge.

Movahedi, M. J., & Tavacoly, G. (2016). Euthanasia in religion-based deontology. Medical Ethics Journal10(34), 165-186.

O’brien, M. E. (2017). Spirituality in nursing. Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Rumun, A. J. (2014). Influence of religious beliefs on healthcare practice. International Journal of Education and Research2(4), 37-47.

Sharp, S. (2017). Belief in miracles and attitudes towards voluntary euthanasia. Death studies41(4), 211-219.

SSorajjakool, S., Carr, M. F., Nam, J. J., Sorajjakool, S., & Bursey, E. (2017). World religions for healthcare professionals. Routledge.

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